Essential Factors When Choosing Iron Sights

Having the batteries for an optic fail when you are planning a day of hunting or target practice can take all the fun out of everything if you don’t have a good set of BUIS. Back up iron sights (BUIS) come in many different configurations and options, ideal for mounting on a rifle as a stand-alone system or in conjunction with your scope.

While a BUIS may seem like a basic element for a long gun, they are not all the same. Knowing what you want and need and then comparing your options will allow you to find the ideal iron sights for your shooting style and your weapon.

The Basics

A BUIS includes two different sights, a front, and a rear sight, that must be correctly aligned to provide accuracy for targeting. The sights are installed on the gun and then aligned and zeroed to provide high degrees of accuracy for shooters that take the time to learn the method behind using the sights.

In general, there are BUIS systems for any type of barrel and optic. This is particularly important on AR15s that may have continuous rails or rails standard handguards, and either configuration will work with the sights.

For those weapons with a scope, a flip up sight is often recommended. This allows the sight to be in the down position and out of the way of the scope until needed. The other option is a fixed front and rear sight, which an important consideration if using a red-dot scope and using the iron sights as a secondary sighting option. These types of systems will need to be aligned, so the sight and the red-dot scope are zeroed to the same position.

Another essential factor will be the sight mount to the rifle. For hunters in the field or in competitive events, consider the security of the mount of the sight, preventing it from being easily knocked out of alignment through normal use.

Be the first to like.

Be Sociable, Share!

    Author: Greene Connor

    Share This Post On

    Submit a Comment

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    four × one =

    Shares